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Cyberville: Clicks, Culture, And The Creation of an Online Town

Grand Central Publishing
1/30/2010

Cyberville: Clicks, Culture, And The Creation of an Online Town Overview

The founder of Echo, a virtual salon based in New York City -- where people log in to talk about art, movies, books, and the minutia of everyday life -- provides a frank and realistic picture of life online. Stacy Horn, the founder of Echo -- an online salon to which thousands of members log on daily to hang out and talk, gossip, and gripe -- gives an inside look not only at the construction of a cybercommunity but ultimately at life online.


Cyberville: Clicks, Culture, And The Creation of an Online Town Table Of Content



 
And Now?                                         3  
The Rubberneckers                                17   
God, Evil, Mom and Dad and Frank Sinatra         49   
Boyz and Gurlz                                   81   
In the Flesh                                     113   
The Fear                                         131   
Banished!                                        157   
Who Let the Nazi In?                             197   
And Who Invited You?                             229   
This Is the Chapter About Sex                    277   
That's Life in the Inferno of Post Modernity     307   
Log Off, Bye, Quit                               329 
Index of the Echoids Mentioned in the Book       335


Cyberville: Clicks, Culture, And The Creation of an Online Town Editorial Reviews

BUST Magazine

If you're someone who's in charge of an online community, or just thinking about starting one, then there isn't anyone better to learn from than Horn, the undisputed Mistress of her Domain Name.

Library Journal

Long before America Online and Compuserv became household names, there was Echo, a small, New York City-based online service. Like its San Francisco counterpart, The WELL, Echo was a cyberspace pioneer at a time when no one believed the Internet would amount to anything. This book is not so much a step-by-step account of how Horn, using severance pay, started Echo in 1989 in her one-bedroom Greenwich Village apartment; rather, it's Horn's enthusiastic tribute to the online community that developed over the years. Excerpting bits of online dialog, she tries to re-create for non-Echoids (readers) what life is like in cyberspace: the conversations, the issues (from hate speech to O.J.), the people (from Embraceable Ewe, a preoperative transsexual wanting to join the women-only conference, to Euroman, an obnoxious subscriber eventually banished from Echo). Sometimes Horn tries too hard to prove the significance of these conversations, most of which seem to be conducted at a high-school level. Still, readers curious about this brave new world will enjoy her lively account.Wilda Williams, "Library Journal"


Readers' Reviews